The 2014 Toledo water crisis drew world-wide attention to a crucial question: How do we balance our need for clean water with our need for abundant food? 

MODERATOR

  • Gail Hogan, retired Emmy award winning broadcast journalist View Full Bio

    Gail Hogan is an Emmy award winning broadcast journalist who has worked in TV and radio for over 30 years. Gail retired from TV news in September 2014.

    Gail has worked as a TV news reporter, news anchor, news magazine co-host, radio morning show personality, media trainer and most recently the founder of her own business, GMH Media, Ltd.  A few years ago, Gail founded, produced and hosted her own weekly TV talk show, Showcase Columbus.  That weekly show was the foundation for the daily live program, Daytime Columbus, where she acted as host and executive producer for years until retirement.

    Gail also has a career as freelance talent. Her expertise includes on camera and voice over talent work. She spent most of her TV and radio years in Columbus, Ohio, working at WSYX-TV, WCMH-TV, 610/TVN Radio and WLVQ-FM.

    Currently, Gail is partnering with the Ohio State University Ross Heart Hospital on wellness and community health projects promoting heart health. As a heart disease survivor, Gail is passionate about heart health education and has spent more than 25 years working for the Central Ohio Chapter of the American Heart Association. 

    Gail is a Toledo native, a graduate of the University of Toledo, and travels to Toledo frequently to visit family who live in the area. She is married to Dan Hogan and they have 3 grown children.

     

PANEL 1: LESSONS FROM TOLEDO WATER CRISIS

  • Sandy Bihn, president, Toledo Lighthouse Society and executive director, Lake Erie Waterkeeper Inc. View Full Bio

    Sandy Bihn is president of the Toledo Lighthouse Society, executive director of Lake Erie Waterkeeper Inc. and vice president of Lake Erie Improvement Association. As Lake Erie Waterkeeper, Sandy has developed a relationship with fishermen, boaters, waterfront property owners and businesses to advocate for improving Lake Erie water quality. Key programs include nutrients/algae, invasives, water levels, climate change, sturgeon, water testing/education and outreach. Sandy is a member, since 2003, of the Great Lakes Collaboration and Healing Our Waters efforts. She also works with the Lake Erie LAMP, Coastal Zone Management and other organizations to benefit Lake Erie's waters. She has been appointed to the International Joint Commission Great Lakes Water Quality Board. Sandy has been the Lake Erie Waterkeeper since 2004, which is a licensed program of the International Waterkeeper Alliance for fishable, swimmable, drinkable water.

    Sandy has been the president of the Toledo Lighthouse Society since its establishment in 2004 with membership growing from less than a dozen to over 500. The organization has restoration plans and specifications that will cost $1.5 million. The organization has improved access to the lighthouse and will be holding the 12th annual festival in 2015 at Maumee Bay State Park July 11 & 12.

    Sandy has a Master’s degree in Business Administration, major finance, from the University of Toledo and also attended the University of Delaware and Ohio University. Sandy has been a shoreline resident of Maumee Bay/Lake Erie since 1987.

     

  • Rich Nachazel, president, Destination Toledo, Inc. View Full Bio

    Rich Nachazel has been involved in the hospitality business for more than 40 years. Starting with Holiday Inns in the '70s, Rich has managed a number of branded properties including Marriott Residence Inn, Hilton, Crowne Plaza, Ramada and others. As a regional manager for First Hospitality Group of Chicago, Rich oversaw 14 hotel properties in Ohio, Michigan and Indiana. Rich was also the executive director of the Toledo Convention & Visitors Bureau during the mid '80s, when Seagate Convention Center was built and many downtown improvements occurred. Today, as president of Destination Toledo, Inc., Rich manages a staff of 6 hospitality professionals who assist hotels, tourism businesses and other industries in the Toledo region to book additional business, generate new revenues and support many thousands of associated jobs.

  • Adam Sharp, vice president of public policy, Ohio Farm Bureau Federation View Full Bio

    Adam Sharp is vice president of public policy for the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation (OFBF). He is responsible for directing the organization’s policy and political activities.

    Adam joined the Ohio Farm Bureau in 2004 as director of national affairs. Prior to Ohio Farm Bureau, he was acting counselor on agricultural policy to the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and served as political deputy over the EPA’s pesticide office. Both positions were White House political appointments. Adam also was director of governmental relations for the American Farm Bureau Federation.

    Adam and his family are involved with their family farm in Fairfield County; he has two children. He is a graduate of Ohio State University, where he majored in agricultural communications.

     

PANEL 2: BALANCING THE FOOD AND WATER EQUATION

  • Jack Fisher, executive vice president, Ohio Farm Bureau Federation View Full Bio

    John C. (Jack) Fisher has served since 1996 as the executive vice president of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, Ohio’s largest general farm organization with more than 201,000 members.

    Fisher has extensive experience in both government and agribusiness. He was deputy director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture, director of the Illinois Corn Growers Association and Marketing Board, executive director of governmental affairs and commodities for Illinois Farm Bureau, and plant manager for the popcorn division of Wyandot, Inc.

    He is a former member of the Board of Trustees at The Ohio State University and currently serves as a member of the Vice President’s Advisory Council for The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

    Additionally, Fisher participates in the Farm Foundation Round Table and Dialogue on Food and Agriculture in the 21st Century initiative and serves on the Board of Trustees for BioOhio and the Columbus 2020 Economic Development Board. He also is co‐chair of the OSU College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Fundraising Campaign Planning and Fundraising Organization. He has served as a member of The Ohio State University Alumni Association Board of Directors, Ohio Farmland Preservation Task Force, Advisory Committee for the Swank Chair in Rural Urban Policy at The Ohio State University, and the Board of Directors for Children’s Hunger Alliance. Over the years, Fisher has participated in several international trade missions with both government and commodity interests.

  • Josh Knights, executive director, The Nature Conservancy in Ohio View Full Bio

    Josh Knights leads a team of experts dedicated to conserving Ohio’s landscapes for people and nature. Under his direction, the Conservancy led the ballot campaign to renew the Clean Ohio Fund, secured the remaining financing needed for the state’s acquisition of the 16,000‐acre Vinton Furnace Experimental State Forest, and launched an effort to create the largest unbroken protected forest in Ohio by connecting its Edge of Appalachia preserve to Shawnee State Forest. Josh was appointed by the President of the Ohio Senate to serve on the Great Lakes Compact Advisory Board and by the Governor to serve on the Ohio Recreation and Resources Commission. He received the 2013 Green Leader award from the Mid‐Ohio Regional Planning Council for his team’s work with the General Assembly to secure $100 million for the Clean Ohio Fund. Prior to returning to his home state, Josh headed corporate partnerships at the Conservancy’s headquarters in Arlington, Virginia. He previously worked on policy issues in Washington, D.C., at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the law firm of White & Case. Josh lives with his wife Lara and their two children in Columbus, Ohio.

  • Jay Martin, lead faculty for the Global Water Initiative and the Field to Faucet Program, Ohio State University View Full Bio

    Jay Martin is a professor of ecological engineering who analyzes and integrates coupled human and natural systems. He serves as the Lead Faculty for the Global Water Initiative and the Field to Faucet Program at Ohio State. His research focuses on interactions between watersheds and downstream ecosystems and interactions with residents. He is currently leading an NSF project investigating connections between water quality in western Lake Erie and the upstream watershed. He has completed similar projects in the Great Lakes and Mississippi Delta/Gulf of Mexico. His other areas of research include natural systems for water treatment, small­scale bioenergy production, and analyzing ecosystem sustainability.

  • Terry McClure, vice chairman, Ohio Soybean Council Board View Full Bio

    Terry McClure of Paulding County is vice chairman of the Ohio Soybean Council Board and currently serves as a board member of the national-level Soy Transportation Coalition.  McClure also is a member of the board of directors of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.  Previously, McClure was president of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, a board member of the Ohio Small Grains Marketing Program, and a board member of the Paulding County Soil and Water Conservation District.  McClure is a fifth generation farmer, and grows approximately 4,000 acres of corn, soybeans and wheat in northwest Ohio, along with raising 8,000 hogs for another farm operation