Pictured above is Missouri farmer and U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance (USFRA) Board Member Mike Geske. He says everything is centered around the farm, and we see it as a lifetime investment that we’ll pass along to our children.

Sustainable Since 1910

Mike Geske, Missouri farmer and U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance (USFRA) Board Member, sees his farm as a lifetime investment that he will pass along to his kids. His land in southeastern Missouri has been farmed by his dad and grandfather and he wants to pass it down to his children and grandchildren. Mike started farming in 1972, growing corn, cotton, rice, soybeans and wheat. Recently retired, he still owns his farm with his wife, Jami. Previously serving as a National Corn Growers Association board member, Mike feels fortunate to farm with his son when he had to be away from home.

This Earth Day, find out how Mike and his family are continually improving their farming practices with the intention to make things better for the next generation with the least amount of impact on the land as possible.

How is your farm sustainable?
MG: Everything is centered around the farm, and we see it as a lifetime investment that we’ll pass along to our children. The land has been farmed by my dad and grandfather and I want to pass it down to my children and grandchildren. In my 40 years of farming, it’s been phenomenal to watch the developments in technology on the farm to help us improve and become more efficient.

How do farmers and ranchers care for the environment?
MG: We strive to use precise amounts of inputs in fighting weeds, pests and diseases, in order to grow a healthy supply of food for today’s consumers. My grandkids live right next to me, so I’m not interested in doing anything that would have a negative impact to their health or our health.

Why is soil important to you?
MG: Our soil holds the nutrients that enhance our crop’s yield and performance. It’s important to protect our soil and not till the residue from previous crops. These practices that farmers employ today have diminished soil erosion and the impact on the environment.

How are you continually improving?
MG: Our focus is to always improve the farm and make it better. In an article with Missouri Farmer Today, Mike shares that every year we’re doing things differently. It’s constantly changing, and that makes it constantly exciting. You never know what it’s going to be, but you start each year with a lot of optimism.

Why should consumers care about agriculture being sustainable?
MG: Consumers should be happy to know farmers are doing things for the long term, not the short term. Everything is focused on improving and making things better for the next generation with the least amount of impact on the land as possible.